terredoc-usa

Get a Glimpse of Liz: in the Closet of a Glittering Icon
Experience a rare moment in history, not to be  missed.  Screen legend, Elizabeth Taylor, a phenomenally talented  actress, driven by a passionate desire to help those less fortunate,  will always be remembered as one of the most exquisite women in the  world: A truly beautiful body & soul.
Ms. Taylor was also known for collecting the finest jewels, and sparkling in them, for her public, throughout her life.
In early December, Christie’s Auction House will  showcase a selection of spectacular jewels for an evening sale, from Ms.  Taylor’s personal collection through December 17, 2011.
Right across the street from terre d’Oc.  Visit us both and be inspired.
Dec 2

Get a Glimpse of Liz: in the Closet of a Glittering Icon

Experience a rare moment in history, not to be missed.  Screen legend, Elizabeth Taylor, a phenomenally talented actress, driven by a passionate desire to help those less fortunate, will always be remembered as one of the most exquisite women in the world: A truly beautiful body & soul.

Ms. Taylor was also known for collecting the finest jewels, and sparkling in them, for her public, throughout her life.

In early December, Christie’s Auction House will showcase a selection of spectacular jewels for an evening sale, from Ms. Taylor’s personal collection through December 17, 2011.

Right across the street from terre d’Oc.  Visit us both and be inspired.

darksilenceinsuburbia: Rafal Olbinski.http://www.tendreams.org/olbinski.htm
An innovative artist whose imagination makes us rethink nature & beauty. 
Dec 2

darksilenceinsuburbia: Rafal Olbinski.http://www.tendreams.org/olbinski.htm

An innovative artist whose imagination makes us rethink nature & beauty. 

Why Organic Makeup?
Beauty shouldn’t be blind.  It can be healthy too.  Statistics say we absorb up to 60% of what we apply topically into our bodies.  In some areas it can be as high as 100%.  So then, it’s only logical we widen our awareness of what’s healthy to encompass not only the foods we consume, but also what we put on our bodies.  Many of us have been applying our daily makeup and skin care for so long, it’s a habit we give little thought to, not unlike brushing our teeth.  Once we begin reading the labels of our favorite products it can be an eye-opening experience.  We couldn’t dream of going to the local fast food joint for dinner every day and feasting on trans fat and harmful chemicals, and yet we may have been unknowing feeding our face facial junk-food for years.  
Change begins with awareness.  Don’t read labels blindly.  Know what you want in your cosmetics and also what you don’t want and why.  Vitamins are labeled under their chemical names such as tocopherol is actually vitamin E, and Ascorbic Acid is Vitamin C.  The order ingredients are listed goes according to highest concentrations first.  Mineral oil, lanolin and petroleum are used to soften skin and in the majority of skin care and cosmetics.  These substances lay on the surface of the skin, not unlike wrapping skin in cellophane, clogging the pores, and cause bacteria to breed underneath the skin, resulting in breakouts and blackheads.  
Organic means certified not to contain pesticides period.  It’s important to look for products that use quality ingredients that nurture the skin and also help it thrive.  Look for the active ingredients listed and learn how they work on your particular skin type.  Know what natural oils work with your skin type: for example Argan oil is a non greasy oil, high in antioxidants that can be used with used will all skin types, as are almond and pistachio nut oils, whereas coconut oil and evening primrose are thicker and may be highly effective for dry skin and not preferably for oily skin.    
The benefits of using certified organic cosmetics could easily be compared to consuming processed food versed locally grown produce.  The choice may seem simple, but it’s one that should be done with thought and knowledge.  All products are not created equally.  Treat your face with the loving care it deserves, and the results will be luminous skin.   
Dec 2

Why Organic Makeup?

Beauty shouldn’t be blind.  It can be healthy too.  Statistics say we absorb up to 60% of what we apply topically into our bodies.  In some areas it can be as high as 100%.  So then, it’s only logical we widen our awareness of what’s healthy to encompass not only the foods we consume, but also what we put on our bodies.  Many of us have been applying our daily makeup and skin care for so long, it’s a habit we give little thought to, not unlike brushing our teeth.  Once we begin reading the labels of our favorite products it can be an eye-opening experience.  We couldn’t dream of going to the local fast food joint for dinner every day and feasting on trans fat and harmful chemicals, and yet we may have been unknowing feeding our face facial junk-food for years. 

Change begins with awareness.  Don’t read labels blindly.  Know what you want in your cosmetics and also what you don’t want and why.  Vitamins are labeled under their chemical names such as tocopherol is actually vitamin E, and Ascorbic Acid is Vitamin C.  The order ingredients are listed goes according to highest concentrations first.  Mineral oil, lanolin and petroleum are used to soften skin and in the majority of skin care and cosmetics.  These substances lay on the surface of the skin, not unlike wrapping skin in cellophane, clogging the pores, and cause bacteria to breed underneath the skin, resulting in breakouts and blackheads. 

Organic means certified not to contain pesticides period.  It’s important to look for products that use quality ingredients that nurture the skin and also help it thrive.  Look for the active ingredients listed and learn how they work on your particular skin type.  Know what natural oils work with your skin type: for example Argan oil is a non greasy oil, high in antioxidants that can be used with used will all skin types, as are almond and pistachio nut oils, whereas coconut oil and evening primrose are thicker and may be highly effective for dry skin and not preferably for oily skin.   

The benefits of using certified organic cosmetics could easily be compared to consuming processed food versed locally grown produce.  The choice may seem simple, but it’s one that should be done with thought and knowledge.  All products are not created equally.  Treat your face with the loving care it deserves, and the results will be luminous skin.   

 Does the Thought Really Count?

Anyone can pop a gift in a box, tie a bow, and call it a present—but these elegant and adorable handmade teapot covers from Lili’s workshop are unique.  Each one sits like a silken hat atop your favorite brew, keeping it warm & beautiful.  Giving one implies you’ve taken some time and energy to truly think about whom you’re giving too.  And after all, isn’t that what really matters?  
Dec 2

 Does the Thought Really Count?


Anyone can pop a gift in a box, tie a bow, and call it a present—but these elegant and adorable handmade teapot covers from Lili’s workshop are unique.  Each one sits like a silken hat atop your favorite brew, keeping it warm & beautiful.  Giving one implies you’ve taken some time and energy to truly think about whom you’re giving too.  And after all, isn’t that what really matters?  

Nov 24

Vintage Holiday Glam. 

(Source: shiroganetake)

Siesta Under the Fig Tree

Warm, woodsy and wonderful.  Hints of peach and fig notes make this Provencal inspired home fragrance a true thing of beauty. 
Nov 14

Siesta Under the Fig Tree

Warm, woodsy and wonderful.  Hints of peach and fig notes make this Provencal inspired home fragrance a true thing of beauty. 

Exceptional Teas Chosen like Fine Wine
From one season to the next, and following the harvests, terre d’Oc has entrusted great tea master, Olivier Scala with the task of selecting a collection of new teas brought back from his trips around the world.  These subtle, precious unflavoured teas will tempt the taste buds of connoisseurs, tea lovers or newcomers to tea.
BLACK INDIAN TEA - Well-known for the quality and subtlety of its teas, lndia is today the leading tea producer, to such a point that tea has become the favorite Indian beverage. This subtly spicy tea is drunk English-style with a drop of milk or Indian-style with milk and spices.
RUSSIAN BLACK TEA - With citrus fruit this Russian-style tea is the name given to a blend of three black China teas specially elaborated for the Russian empire. With added citrus essences and dried peel, this golden tea has a fruity tangy flavour and is usually drunk very strong and sweet, with a slice of lemon.
SRI LANKAN BLACK TEA - With cinnamon.  This tea, which is grown using traditional methods, comes from the tiny tea gardens of the central region of Kandy in Sri Lanka. It is always offered to the passing visitor and is often drunk very sweet with cinnamon and a lot of milk to reveal its strong spicy flavour.
RED EARL GREY CHINA TEA - Thanks to a unique know-how, fine strips of leaves are obtained without being torn. This is what gives this tea all the complex and intensely fruity aromas of peel and bergamot. This Earl Grey is a russet-coloured tea full of flavour and body, and which was once considered as the best of red teas.
Nov 8

Exceptional Teas Chosen like Fine Wine


From one season to the next, and following the harvests, terre d’Oc has entrusted great tea master, Olivier Scala with the task of selecting a collection of new teas brought back from his trips around the world.  These subtle, precious unflavoured teas will tempt the taste buds of connoisseurs, tea lovers or newcomers to tea.

BLACK INDIAN TEA - Well-known for the quality and subtlety of its teas, lndia is today the leading tea producer, to such a point that tea has become the favorite Indian beverage. This subtly spicy tea is drunk English-style with a drop of milk or Indian-style with milk and spices.


RUSSIAN BLACK TEA - With citrus fruit this Russian-style tea is the name given to a blend of three black China teas specially elaborated for the Russian empire. With added citrus essences and dried peel, this golden tea has a fruity tangy flavour and is usually drunk very strong and sweet, with a slice of lemon.


SRI LANKAN BLACK TEA - With cinnamon.  This tea, which is grown using traditional methods, comes from the tiny tea gardens of the central region of Kandy in Sri Lanka. It is always offered to the passing visitor and is often drunk very sweet with cinnamon and a lot of milk to reveal its strong spicy flavour.


RED EARL GREY CHINA TEA - Thanks to a unique know-how, fine strips of leaves are obtained without being torn. This is what gives this tea all the complex and intensely fruity aromas of peel and bergamot. This Earl Grey is a russet-coloured tea full of flavour and body, and which was once considered as the best of red teas.

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness."

- John Keats

Nov 8
Interview with Bob Clyatt, a sculptor who uses nature as part of his process.

Of all the art forms, why sculpture?
 I think sculpture picks you, not the other way around.  I had always loved looking at sculpture, but never considered it as a medium.  One day I was helping my son on a school project, making a clay minotaur, and it was like a buzzing noise in my ears just took over and I was wetting and shaping the clay – couldn’t stop.  And right from the start I knew I wanted to do the figure.  At that point I started eight years of formal studies, with the best figurative sculpture teachers I could find.  Lots of anatomy studies along the way, too.
What do you enjoy most about the medium?
To make sculpture I think you have to be part handyman, part craftsman and part artist.  I am on my feet, moving around, and at the workbench, or working on the piece itself, firing and glazing, gluing or welding.   At the end I have a piece, which exists in the same 3D space we live–a real thing in the world, which conveys ideas and emotions in ways beyond what decorative or functional objects can.
And I do love the feeling of seeing this being come into the world, take shape, and start to speak.  Making the heads and faces is one of the most mysterious aspects of my work, and is often not taken straight from the model.
How does the clay feel in your hands?
It has different moods–sometimes smoother—sometimes drier.   Clay is earth, millions of years old, and holding it and working with it somehow connects me to something ancient.
My favorite clays to hold and work are porcelains, which feel like the most wonderful cool creamy peanut butter, just perfect.
Your pieces have an unusual crackled look.  Can you describe how you make that magic happen?  
After a clay piece dries it’s ready for its first firing, in an electric kiln that makes it bisque (white, rough, strong) and ready for glazing.  I mix my own glazes and usually fire the pieces a second time in the raku kiln, a gas-fired kiln with a special twist.  I take the pieces out, red-hot, using Kevlar gloves, leather jacket and a facemask.  Then I place them into a canister with leaves, sticks and natural materials from my garden and clamp a lid on top.  As the piece cools in the smoky can, an hour or two—quick by clay standards—the carbon is sucked into the piece forming the cracks and deposits, which give the raku fired figures their distinctive look.
Speaking internally, what moves you to create?
One idea guides my work: If reincarnation were true, what would I want to stumble across a hundred years from now that might speak to me and help make my life better?  The beauty of thinking this way is that it doesn’t matter if reincarnation is “true” or not–someone will be here a hundred years from now and your work could help them.  While artists all make a very deep and personal journey, alternately tormented and pleasure-filled, I think it’s important to remember the fruits of this journey can be shared.  For that reason, I create to be part of a cultural conversation, to fully participate and contribute my voice to this time, for all time.
How does inspiration hit you? 
My work is figurative, and my inspiration comes from several sources.  Sometimes I’ll be moving around and suddenly feel a huge jolt of awareness about the position I am in.  Then I’ll make a quick sketch and later see if it can make a good sculpture.  Other times… I get a flash of inspiration for a pose, a gesture, an expression, and again sketch it or remember it for later.  Sculpture takes a lot of time so it isn’t always possible to get on a new idea right away.  
Each piece needs to relate to the ideas that inform and inspire my work on multiple levels.  So it should look interesting, feel and resonate in an interesting way physically, and also nestle into the back of the mind with a grain of something that keeps you thinking. 
Walk us through your process.
My studio is my home.  I just built an all-glass conservatory, including the roof, which makes it easier to keep multiple pieces going at once.  Around noon I start getting focused and usually have clay on my hands by 1:00.  I work steadily through the day, sometimes ending well after midnight.  
Often I work out a new pose with my model.  For example, I think a lot about freedom and restrictions.  My work and life seems preoccupied with trying to get a glimpse back to something lost or forgotten—like trying to remember a dream upon waking.   So I may have new ideas for a gesture, body position, or composition that will reflect that. 
Can you describe how you work with live models?  
In a recent piece, Returning, I had the idea of “Turning, Returning, Retrieving something precious that has been lost, left behind.” I discussed this at length with my models, a young couple, and we looked at a number of my pieces (and some art history books!) then left them alone to process these ideas.  When I returned we went through their ideas and made refinements.  Then I raced around them looking at the pose from all angles, trying to see it as sculpture and whether it would work, whether it felt like something done by someone else already, would convey the ideas effectively, and whether it worked practically as a piece that would stand up and not fall over.  So the piece is really a creative collaboration with the models – with the best models it’s always this way.
Then I sketched quick drawings to capture the gesture and help us remember the piece later, and I made a quick sculpted maquette— small, loose, taking an hour or so—that let me see the piece in 3-D and understand the key aspects of the composition.  For the maquettes I use an oil-based clay that doesn’t dry, around wire armatures that bend easily and stand up.  After a few days of looking at and playing with the maquette, I blocked in a larger clay figure (regular clay that gets glazed and fired) and let it harden overnight.  The next day the woman model came and I refined the clay piece.  I did the same thing over the following days with the man model.  Finally I connected the two figures and refined the overall interaction between them, get hands gripping arms right, etc.
We worked in the all-glass greenhouse, wall shades down for privacy, but with light from the ceiling all around, deer and rabbits munching away just outside the window, music from my ipod playing randomly everything from Hindu chants to Django Reinhardt.  Really bliss – not sure if ‘work’ is the right word…
(Bob Clyatt can be reached through his website, and will be exhibiting his work at the Contemporary Art Fair NYC on November 18 • 19 • 20 at the Jacob Javits Center.)
Nov 8

Interview with Bob Clyatt, a sculptor who uses nature as part of his process.


Of all the art forms, why sculpture?

 I think sculpture picks you, not the other way around.  I had always loved looking at sculpture, but never considered it as a medium.  One day I was helping my son on a school project, making a clay minotaur, and it was like a buzzing noise in my ears just took over and I was wetting and shaping the clay – couldn’t stop.  And right from the start I knew I wanted to do the figure.  At that point I started eight years of formal studies, with the best figurative sculpture teachers I could find.  Lots of anatomy studies along the way, too.

What do you enjoy most about the medium?

To make sculpture I think you have to be part handyman, part craftsman and part artist.  I am on my feet, moving around, and at the workbench, or working on the piece itself, firing and glazing, gluing or welding.   At the end I have a piece, which exists in the same 3D space we live–a real thing in the world, which conveys ideas and emotions in ways beyond what decorative or functional objects can.

And I do love the feeling of seeing this being come into the world, take shape, and start to speak.  Making the heads and faces is one of the most mysterious aspects of my work, and is often not taken straight from the model.

How does the clay feel in your hands?

It has different moods–sometimes smoother—sometimes drier.   Clay is earth, millions of years old, and holding it and working with it somehow connects me to something ancient.

My favorite clays to hold and work are porcelains, which feel like the most wonderful cool creamy peanut butter, just perfect.

Your pieces have an unusual crackled look.  Can you describe how you make that magic happen? 

After a clay piece dries it’s ready for its first firing, in an electric kiln that makes it bisque (white, rough, strong) and ready for glazing.  I mix my own glazes and usually fire the pieces a second time in the raku kiln, a gas-fired kiln with a special twist.  I take the pieces out, red-hot, using Kevlar gloves, leather jacket and a facemask.  Then I place them into a canister with leaves, sticks and natural materials from my garden and clamp a lid on top.  As the piece cools in the smoky can, an hour or two—quick by clay standards—the carbon is sucked into the piece forming the cracks and deposits, which give the raku fired figures their distinctive look.

Speaking internally, what moves you to create?

One idea guides my work: If reincarnation were true, what would I want to stumble across a hundred years from now that might speak to me and help make my life better?  The beauty of thinking this way is that it doesn’t matter if reincarnation is “true” or not–someone will be here a hundred years from now and your work could help them.  While artists all make a very deep and personal journey, alternately tormented and pleasure-filled, I think it’s important to remember the fruits of this journey can be shared.  For that reason, I create to be part of a cultural conversation, to fully participate and contribute my voice to this time, for all time.

How does inspiration hit you?

My work is figurative, and my inspiration comes from several sources.  Sometimes I’ll be moving around and suddenly feel a huge jolt of awareness about the position I am in.  Then I’ll make a quick sketch and later see if it can make a good sculpture.  Other times… I get a flash of inspiration for a pose, a gesture, an expression, and again sketch it or remember it for later.  Sculpture takes a lot of time so it isn’t always possible to get on a new idea right away. 

Each piece needs to relate to the ideas that inform and inspire my work on multiple levels.  So it should look interesting, feel and resonate in an interesting way physically, and also nestle into the back of the mind with a grain of something that keeps you thinking.

Walk us through your process.

My studio is my home.  I just built an all-glass conservatory, including the roof, which makes it easier to keep multiple pieces going at once.  Around noon I start getting focused and usually have clay on my hands by 1:00.  I work steadily through the day, sometimes ending well after midnight. 

Often I work out a new pose with my model.  For example, I think a lot about freedom and restrictions.  My work and life seems preoccupied with trying to get a glimpse back to something lost or forgotten—like trying to remember a dream upon waking.   So I may have new ideas for a gesture, body position, or composition that will reflect that.

Can you describe how you work with live models? 

In a recent piece, Returning, I had the idea of “Turning, Returning, Retrieving something precious that has been lost, left behind.” I discussed this at length with my models, a young couple, and we looked at a number of my pieces (and some art history books!) then left them alone to process these ideas.  When I returned we went through their ideas and made refinements.  Then I raced around them looking at the pose from all angles, trying to see it as sculpture and whether it would work, whether it felt like something done by someone else already, would convey the ideas effectively, and whether it worked practically as a piece that would stand up and not fall over.  So the piece is really a creative collaboration with the models – with the best models it’s always this way.

Then I sketched quick drawings to capture the gesture and help us remember the piece later, and I made a quick sculpted maquette— small, loose, taking an hour or so—that let me see the piece in 3-D and understand the key aspects of the composition.  For the maquettes I use an oil-based clay that doesn’t dry, around wire armatures that bend easily and stand up.  After a few days of looking at and playing with the maquette, I blocked in a larger clay figure (regular clay that gets glazed and fired) and let it harden overnight.  The next day the woman model came and I refined the clay piece.  I did the same thing over the following days with the man model.  Finally I connected the two figures and refined the overall interaction between them, get hands gripping arms right, etc.

We worked in the all-glass greenhouse, wall shades down for privacy, but with light from the ceiling all around, deer and rabbits munching away just outside the window, music from my ipod playing randomly everything from Hindu chants to Django Reinhardt.  Really bliss – not sure if ‘work’ is the right word…

(Bob Clyatt can be reached through his website, and will be exhibiting his work at the Contemporary Art Fair NYC on November 18 • 19 • 20 at the Jacob Javits Center.)

Coconut:  a Balinese Beauty Secret 
terre d’Oc’s has infused nourishing coconut oil in their skin care line, for those times when you need some extra loving-self-care.  
Here are some hidden wonders of coconut oil:
Hairy Nut: a powerful deep conditioner for dry and damaged hair, as well as a super curl enhancer.  How does it work? Coconut oil speeds up hair re-growth by providing essential proteins that nourish hair follicles.
Pretty Nut: Dry, normal, oily—coconut oil is an equal-opportunity facial-oil.  A fabulous anti-aging tool, it diminishes the appearance of wrinkled and sagging skin.  In some cases Coconut oil has been known to help treat psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema.
Peaceful-Nut: enjoy an aromatic whiff, and let coconut oil soothe your frazzled nerves.  Or rub in your palms and massage right into your scalp.
Skinny-Nut: How? Coconut oil contains short and medium-chain fatty acids so it assists the body in shedding excessive weight, while at the same time helps the thyroid and enzymes systems function properly.  And as it works its magic, it actually increases the metabolism.
Nov 7

Coconut:  a Balinese Beauty Secret

terre d’Oc’s has infused nourishing coconut oil in their skin care line, for those times when you need some extra loving-self-care. 

Here are some hidden wonders of coconut oil:

Hairy Nut: a powerful deep conditioner for dry and damaged hair, as well as a super curl enhancer.  How does it work? Coconut oil speeds up hair re-growth by providing essential proteins that nourish hair follicles.

Pretty Nut: Dry, normal, oily—coconut oil is an equal-opportunity facial-oil.  A fabulous anti-aging tool, it diminishes the appearance of wrinkled and sagging skin.  In some cases Coconut oil has been known to help treat psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema.

Peaceful-Nut: enjoy an aromatic whiff, and let coconut oil soothe your frazzled nerves.  Or rub in your palms and massage right into your scalp.

Skinny-Nut: How? Coconut oil contains short and medium-chain fatty acids so it assists the body in shedding excessive weight, while at the same time helps the thyroid and enzymes systems function properly.  And as it works its magic, it actually increases the metabolism.